Replacing turbo

Discussion in 'VW Mk4 Jetta, Golf, New Beetle, Passat TDI forum' started by chacaocop, Apr 16, 2017.

  1. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2011
    Messages:
    127
    Car:
    Jetta/2000 (totalled by my son) Jetta/2006 (not letting my son drive this one) Jetta/2000 This will be my third TDI.
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    Good day:

    I bought a 2000 Jetta with a blown turbo for my son. Car is very well maintained and is also in due for a new timing belt. I already removed the turbo and yes the blades are damaged and they move all over. I already cleaned the intake manifold as well as the EGR valve. When I removed the exhaust manifold, I encountered lots of oil down the exhaust pipe as well as inside of the intercooler.

    I am replacing the intake oil line, plus the turbo as well as timing belt as I already mentioned.

    My question is, is it necessary to clean the intercooler and the pipes of oil? What happens if I dont? Wont the oil be simply burnt out? If I do have to clean it, what products should be used since I am working out of my garage. Am I missing something that should also be replaced, cleaned?

    Thanks for reading.
     
  2. crsmp5

    crsmp5 Well-Known Member

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    Car:
    85 kubvan
    remove bumper to remove hedlight.. this way you can remove the ic to let it drain in a oil pan/bucket... this way it can be tipped to drain it.. imo in car is not nuff..

    no reason to make it like new.. the breather will fill it with oil vapor.. but any pooling of oil is bad.. with it outta way and all.. makes the timing belt job easier due to the pipe that connects to the top of it can be removed with ease once headlight out

    the exhaust full of oil... no way to clean it out.. it may cook/bake the oil onto the cat... plugging it up :( but the rest will blow out under hard boosted driving where the egt is high and the turbine is pushing lotsa air out the tail pipe... the bad.. your going to cover the rear in oil... ive had it fill up the inner bumper due to pointed down tail pipe tips.. just ozzes oil in your parking spot... it will smoke pretty good if full of oil till burnt out... think in dark.. get on it.. cars headlights behind you dissapear in the dark... get off the freeway to a stop light.. watch the gas station on the corner go missing like if you were inside it be a spilbergh type "fog" movie.. quite impressive :) think for you power outtage cover eyes dark... them inside.. everything just a big fog you cannot see the gaspumps thru winows... quite immpressive..this was a saab that ate a turbo.. and ill admit.. most fun ever... only way id ever do that job a 2nd time.. is just to unfill the exhaust of oil... the guy who pulled up next to me before the cloud over took... his face was priceless till he was going going.. gone... LOL

    i also suggest a set of glass lense e code headlights.. since for your son.. better light output to see in the dark.. glass does not turn yellow.. reflector puts light in good places vs the crap the usa put in stock... e code = European and well worth the investment.. ive run e codes since i got my licence in 89.. ive played with high wattage bulbs, the hid stuff so on... but unless you have a lense and reflector put light in the right places.. nothing will help..

    those $5 bell deer whistls... put a set on.. will fit in the lower center grill and hides well.. test them out at 35mph by driving past a dog.. if it buries its head in the dirt.. they are working... walmart/autozone sell them.. the $5 cost is moot vs a deer hit
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 17, 2017
  3. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

    Joined:
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    Car:
    Jetta/2000 (totalled by my son) Jetta/2006 (not letting my son drive this one) Jetta/2000 This will be my third TDI.
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    Cool. Thanks a lot. I was thinking on using engine degreaser and a bunch of other chemicals. I will just simply drain it. In regards to the headlights, good tip. I saw them before on an online retailer, but as of now I will see if the kid takes care of the car first.

    I personally will get the smoke burn from the exhaust. :)

    Deers? We are in Dallas. We have cows. No point on wasting 5 bucks. :D

    There is another question:

    When I removed the turbo I did it without paying too much attention as of which gaskets were being used and where they were used.

    The EGR valve, sure it is only a rubber gasket.

    But the other gaskets I need to ask the following:

    Intake and Exhaust manifold, do they have an specific way to fit? they are not flat and both have an indentation to one of the sides. Does it make a difference if placed in the wrong way? Please help.

    There are 3 paper gaskets and one metal gasket, is it ok to assume that the three paper gaskets will go on the numbers 1, 2 and 3 on the picture and the metal gasket will go on position 4? Also, the metal gasket has an indentation, does it matter where the indentations face?

    Thanks for your help.

    upload_2017-4-18_21-44-10.png
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2017
  4. crsmp5

    crsmp5 Well-Known Member

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    85 kubvan
    id not use paper gaskets on the exhaust/head area.. yes they make them.. they work great on non turbo cars.. but a turbo will blow them.. they make a metal/paper one.. at min use those.. but they also make double metal and even a 1 piece all 4 in metal.. if you use the 4 singles.. 2 go one way.. 2 go the other... skinny side up.. to put in wrong will blow it too.. why the 1 piece one is nice.. prevents a oops..

    spots 1-4 in your pics should all be double metal.. no paper... i think the oil return line off turbo is the only paper gasket of any item in the pic besides the egr o-ring..

    like i stated in some other thread recently.. the groove is a crush area in the intake gasket... if either manifold or head has wear/notch.. id face the top of the ridge on the flat side so the other side will seal over the rough
     
  5. mgoff5000

    mgoff5000 Member

    Joined:
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    Car:
    2000 Jetta 5-spd, 2004 Passat Wagon
    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    Mods:
    Jetta is on H&R Sport/Koni Yellows, Skid plates on Jetta/Passat, BSD and cam replaced on Passat
    This gasket question would be great in the wiki. I don't know with enough certainty to post it however. I just did this job over the weekend and here's what I found in searching:

    Intake - in one post CCBB said put the raised ridge toward the intake manifold. This works with crsmp5 advice since usually the aluminum manifold is going to have the imperfections. (mine did)

    Exhaust manifold gaskets - doesn't matter which side, but they DO have a L/R orientation. Look at the manifold shape and it'll be obvious.

    EGR Cooler piping: My Bentley diagram has the same number for all four. The kit I got from Cascade and the gasket I took off the bottom of the EGR valve was a composite. Rest are metal and I don't think orientation matters on the raised side.

    EGR valve - yes rubber gasket where it connects to intake manifold, supposed to be replaced. Although I left mine on the intake.

    I agree with crsmp5 - don't think the paper ones you got are right. At a minimum I'd use metal on the connection to exhaust manifold because that one's gonna be toughest to get at later!
     
  6. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Car:
    Jetta/2000 (totalled by my son) Jetta/2006 (not letting my son drive this one) Jetta/2000 This will be my third TDI.
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    Thanks a lot for your assistance. I will pay really good attention at the assembly time on all the details in regards to the orientation of the gaskets. I will contact my supplier in regards to the metal and paper gaskets. Three metal ones and one paper one came off the car while the kit sent had three paper and one metal. I will really ask them about that.

    I have another question though.

    When I took the turbo out, I removed the intake manifold and turbo, kept all the parts and screws as well as where they came from, all but one piece of metal that I have no clue where is supposed to go. It looks like a heat shield but where does it go, is something I do not know. Can someone shed some light and show me where this go?

    Thanks in advance.

    20170427_144258.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2017
  7. crsmp5

    crsmp5 Well-Known Member

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    bottom 2 exhaust manifold nuts on #1&2... lower section of the heat shield rubs on it
     
  8. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

    Joined:
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    Car:
    Jetta/2000 (totalled by my son) Jetta/2006 (not letting my son drive this one) Jetta/2000 This will be my third TDI.
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    Thank you very, very much!!!
     

    Attached Files:

  9. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2011
    Messages:
    127
    Car:
    Jetta/2000 (totalled by my son) Jetta/2006 (not letting my son drive this one) Jetta/2000 This will be my third TDI.
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    Good day:

    Turbo is in place, timing belt done car is running like a charm.... but engine light came on with two codes.

    P0234 Turbo Overboost condition
    P0128 Engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor.

    Any ideas as of where to start would be greatly appreciated.

    The prior owner stated that he has had that same code for a while and then the turbo blew up. So I am assuming that something on the vacuum system is not working properly where to start is where I need you assistance.

    Also the ECT sensor, where is located? I most likely did not plug it correctly causing this code.

    Turbo installed was a VNT-15 from ID parts.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  10. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2011
    Messages:
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    Car:
    Jetta/2000 (totalled by my son) Jetta/2006 (not letting my son drive this one) Jetta/2000 This will be my third TDI.
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
  11. Keithuk

    Keithuk Super Moderator

    Joined:
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    Car:
    2010 Golf GTD (170) CBBB
    Location:
    Stoke on Trent, England
    P0128 Engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor incorrect.

    e.g.

    VAG Error Code: 16499

    EOBD II Error Code: P0115

    Fault Location:
    Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (G62) - Circuit Malfunction

    Possible Cause:
    Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL)(K83) active.
    Difficulties with starting a cold engine.
    Starting the engine when engine is warmish or warm, idle rpm immediately is 1200 - 3000 rpm.
    RPM at idle is irregular.
    With all engine temperatures idle rpm will often vary between 900 - 1000 rpm.
    With engine warm (90 °C) the engine temperature suddenly drops (70 °C) and slowly comes back to 90 °C.
    Bad acceleration during warm-up.
    Diesel Engines: Glow plug indicator may be on for a longer than normal time or at ambient temperatures where it shouldn't come on at all.

    Wiring/Connector(s).
    Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (G62).
    Engine Control Module (ECM).

    Possible Solutions:
    Check/Replace all faulty Wiring/Connector(s).
    Read Measuring Value Blocks (MVB).
    Check/Replace Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (G62).

    Special Notes:
    In many cars between MY 1995-2002 the G2/(G62) had a bad reputation for failing often. The original G2/(G62) sensor is black and the improved replacements are green.





    VAG Error Code: 16512/4484

    EOBD II Error Code: P0128

    Fault Location:
    Coolant Thermostat Valve (N214) - Temperature below Control Range

    Possible Cause:
    Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL)(K83) active.

    Leaking or stuck open thermostat.
    Low engine coolant level.
    Insufficient warm up time.
    Faulty engine coolant temperature sensor.
    Engine coolant temperature sensor harness is open or shorted.
    Engine coolant temperature sensor circuit poor electrical connection.
    Coolant Thermostat Valve (N214).
    Mechanical fault.

    Tech Notes:
    If cooling system is not leaking and the fluid level is OK, replacing the thermostat usually takes care of the problem.

    When is the code detected?:
    The engine coolant temperature does not reach to specified temperature even though the engine has run long enough.

    Description:
    Indicates that the thermostat monitor has not achieved the required engine operating temperature within a specified amount of time after starting the engine.

    VAG Error Code: 16618/000564

    EOBD II Error Code: P0234

    Fault Location:
    Boost Pressure - Regulation Limit Exceeded (Overboost Condition)

    Possible Cause:
    Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL)(K83) active.
    Boost Pressure too high.
    Reduced Power Output.

    Hoses incorrectly connected, disconnected, blocked or leaking.
    Solenoid Valve for Boost Pressure Control (N75) faulty.
    Manifold Pressure/Boost Sensor (G31) faulty.
    Turbocharger stuck/faulty.

    Possible Solutions:
    Check Charge Pressure Control System.
    Read Measuring Value Blocks (MVB).
    Perform Output Test (to check the Turbocharger).
    Perform Basic Setting (to check the Charge Pressure Control).
    Difference of set value boost pressure vs. altitude sensor signal > 200 - 1275 hPa.
    Perform Pressure Test to locate Leaks.
    Check/Replace Solenoid Valve for Boost Pressure Control (N75).
    Check/Replace Manifold Pressure/Boost Sensor (G31).
    Check/Replace Turbocharger.

    Description:
    The boost pressure sensor responds to pressure changes in the intake manifold. This pressure is created by the turbocharger and changes with accelerator pedal position and engine speed. The Engine Control Module (ECM) uses this information to assist in diagnosis of the barometric pressure (BARO) sensor and to provide engine overboost protection. The boost pressure sensor has a 5-volt reference circuit, a low reference circuit, and a signal circuit. The Engine Control Module (ECM) supplies 5 volts to the boost pressure sensor on the 5-volt reference 2 circuit, and provides a ground on a low reference circuit. The boost pressure sensor provides a signal to the Engine Control Module (ECM) on a signal circuit relative to the pressure changes. The Engine Control Module (ECM) monitors the boost pressure sensor signal for voltage outside of the normal range. The Engine Control Module (ECM) calculates a predicted value for the boost pressure sensor. The Engine Control Module (ECM) then compares the predicted value to the actual signal.

    As taken from my new Free EOBD II Error Codes software
     
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  12. crsmp5

    crsmp5 Well-Known Member

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    85 kubvan
    vnt settings correct?? do not think new means set properly.............
     
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  13. Seatman

    Seatman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Car:
    2000 Mk4 Golf Estate 1.9tdi 174 bhp
    Location:
    Scotland
    Mods:
    PP764's, turbo and mapping

    Clear the codes then take the car for a run, perhaps the overboost is why the previous turbo blew, could be old codes.
     
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