Replacing AC Components Questions

Discussion in 'VW Mk4 Jetta, Golf, New Beetle, Passat TDI forum' started by eddi887, Aug 17, 2017.

  1. eddi887

    eddi887 Member

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    Car:
    2003 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    Dale Texas
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    Air intake
    Good Day All,

    I was able to track my non functioning AC issue down to what I believe is the AC clutch, but do the age and mileage on the car, a 2003 Jetta TDI, with over 291,000, and the cost of the clutch itself, I decided to just replace the compressor, as well as most everything else under the hood. I was able to find all the parts for under $200.00, so I figured, why not? What I need is information on removing the AC lines at the firewall, I want to go ahead and flush those out before connecting all the new parts. I also need to find out where I can get the necessary O-rings, are they just standard O-rings I can get at any parts place? Are there any special tools, torque specs, or anything else that I need to be aware of?

    Thanks...Jeff
     
  2. speedy223

    speedy223 New Member

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    Car:
    98 new beetle tdi
    just standard ac o rings like the green ones at oreillys. i bought a 20 dollar multi pack just match sizes. has lasted thru many jobs. worth it. be careful taking lines down on the firewall. if you twist the part that goes into the cabin you will want to sell the car, whole dash comes out to get to the inside part and it is long weary job at least to a big guy like me, hate working inside the car. i would just flush the easy lines off the compressor, of course change the dryer , bolt it back up and enjoy cold air. dont forget to make sure your fans working good while you are there.
    just my 2 cents but i have done several of these
     
  3. eddi887

    eddi887 Member

    Joined:
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    Car:
    2003 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    Dale Texas
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    Air intake
    Hi speedy223,

    I found some O-rings, thanks. I'm assuming the line connections at the firewall are under the cover? If I just pop that off I can disconnect from there? Just curious, if I disconnect the lines at the compressor and back flush through the evaporator, will that work ok? Is that what you're referring to? Will the solvent evaporate on it's own, or should I take it somewhere to have it flushed so everything can be evacuated? I do have a vacuum pump, will that remove any solvent out of the system?

    I hear you on working inside a car, I'm not a small guy myself, and being 60 doesn't help matters either!lol

    Thanks...Jeff
     
  4. Keithuk

    Keithuk Super Moderator

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    Jeff.

    When you regas an A/C system you pump out all R134a refrigerant gas and oil which lubricates the compressor. This is an expensive vacuum pump not a Mityvac. Then you refill with refrigerant and the correct grade of oil.

    In the UK you have to be certified to work on A/C systems. You don't discharge the refrigerant gas into the atmosphere.

    There are plenty of video's on YouTube for a cheap way.
     
  5. eddi887

    eddi887 Member

    Joined:
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    Car:
    2003 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    Dale Texas
    Mods:
    Air intake
    Hi Keith,

    There isn't anything left in the system at this point to escape into the atmosphere. I have a 3.5 CFM rotary vane vacuum pump, which from what I understand, will not remove the oil because the oil won't boil under vacuum. I'm replacing the compressor, so I will be adding the correct amount of oil to it before installing. I wanted to clean out the lines before hooking up the new compressor; jus to make sure there were no contaminates in the system. I'm also replacing the receiver/dryer, and possibly the condenser.

    Thanks.Jeff
     
  6. speedy223

    speedy223 New Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2013
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    Car:
    98 new beetle tdi
    mainly just be careful flushing THROUGH the condenser. lots of places say u cant depends on condenser. i would look at lines, did the compressor like mega FAIL with black goo every where or just ordinary freon/oil residue in it? i would flush the two big lines unhook off compressor an d condenser and drier and if it dont look to bad then just hook it up, vacuum it down and charge it if it holds vacuum long enough. make sure you vacuum it down long enough ( sorry if you already know this) . if it really has lots of metal and black particles in it then i would consider changing condenser but you can always ask an ac shop or google if you can flush through it i have never changed one for clogging only leaks but supposedly some can clog badly enough to not be flushable. have not personally seen this yet. . i know on my focus ford says if the compressor fails badly you may or may not be able to flush the condenser ... again, i would flush just the big lines off the compressor unhooked from both spots they connect to and see what it looks like. if it is not dramatically bad just dry them out, bolt them up and vacuum them down probably be fine. keep in mind i am no ac expert but i have done lots of cars for the family and i own 3 vw two of which i did the ac on . so far no problem.
     
  7. eddi887

    eddi887 Member

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    Car:
    2003 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    Dale Texas
    Mods:
    Air intake
    speedy223,

    Thanks for the information, I really appreciate it. I was planning on replacing the condenser and dryer, so all I'll flush the lines, make sure they're clean and dry, then install the new compressor, condenser, and dryer.

    Take care...Jeff
     

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