2010 JSW TDI CJAA Turbo Actuator Replacement

Discussion in 'VW Mk6 Golf, Jetta, Beetle, Sportwagen TDI forum' started by Dugaru, Dec 7, 2013.

  1. Dugaru

    Dugaru New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Car:
    2010 JSW TDI
    Location:
    San Diego
    Hi all,

    New here on the boards. Got the blinking glow plug light and check engine light on the car. Ran VCDS and got code:

    000175 - Actuator Module for Turbocharger 1
    P00AF - 000 - Stuck - MIL ON

    I disconnected the vacuum line to the actuator and tested it with a pump and it was definitely not holding any vacuum when applied (could hear it hiss as it leaked pressure). We verified on my brother-in-law's Golf that this was not expected. I have purchased the new actuator from KermaTDI, but am having issues finding any documentation that anyone has created regarding the best way to replace the actuator on the CBEA/CJAA engines.. Anyone got any links, writeups, etc to point me to?


    Thanks!
     
  2. chittychittybangbang

    chittychittybangbang Administrator

    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
    Messages:
    23,902
    Car:
    2006 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    CT
  3. Dugaru

    Dugaru New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Car:
    2010 JSW TDI
    Location:
    San Diego
    So, my issue with those are that either they are either a) from the older cars, so the layout or parts are slightly different or b) from an engine that is outside of the engine bay. As much as they are helpful, some of the most difficult part is going to be the lack of access since the actuator is right against the firewall and back of the engine bay.

    Was hoping someone had actually done a writeup on this replacement on this model since I have seen reports of people doing it all over in my searches.
     
  4. chittychittybangbang

    chittychittybangbang Administrator

    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
    Messages:
    23,902
    Car:
    2006 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    CT
    The picture above is from your exact model. I used it for demo on an older borg warner turbo because as you said, you can't see anything back there. It's tight but it's possible. You may need a crow's foot to get to the lower nut or use a 1/4" socket.
     
  5. Dugaru

    Dugaru New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Car:
    2010 JSW TDI
    Location:
    San Diego
    Hmm.. Ok. I'm gonna make a go of it this weekend. I am planning on taking as many pictures as possible and documenting the process since I've seen several others report the same issue. Would be good to have that available for others.
     
  6. Dugaru

    Dugaru New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Car:
    2010 JSW TDI
    Location:
    San Diego
    Replacement complete! I was not able to take pictures like I wanted as it was a pretty involved project.. I'll post some tips here below for the next person who needs to replace the same thing..

    This guide should be very closely applicable for both CBEA and CJAA turbo actuator replacements. I did the replacement on a CJAA engine.

    This is the resolution to VCDS fault code:
    000175 - Actuator Module for Turbocharger 1
    P00AF - 000 - Stuck - MIL ON

    After clearing the CEL with VCDS, revving the engine in park would cause the CEL to come back on.

    Make sure you connect a vacuum to the actuator first to verify it is the actuator and not the solenoid. In my case, you could hear air whooshing as the actuator was unable to hold a vacuum seal. I tested the new part when I received it and, with vacuum applied the actuator rod stayed extended and there was no air leakage.

    Using VCDS, reading the requested vs actual boost (guide here: http://www.myturbodiesel.com/1000q/a4/VNT-wastegate-adjust.htm) this is what I saw:
    [​IMG]
    If everything was working properly, the green and yellow lines should have been nearly the same, going up and down with each other as the ECU requested more or less boost, the turbo should respond accordingly with the adjustment of the VNT.

    Here is the part you need: http://www.kermatdi.com/servlet/the-8260/Turbo/Detail

    To start: remove the top engine noise cover as well as the under-engine splash cover (you will likely drop a nut or two during the course of this process).

    Disconnect the MAF, the cable to the actuator (it goes past the actuator and connects to something else on the left-back side of the engine as well, disconnect this too), as well as the cable to the crank-case ventilation. Also disconnect the vacuum to the actuator. Move all of these out of the way.

    Disconnect the crank case ventilator - it has two 'pins' (one on each side) on it which hold it on. It will drop a bit of oil, so wipe that up with a rag.

    Disconnect the turbo intake from the turbo and from out the back of the MAF. To disconnect it from the turbo, see here for the bolt: http://www.myturbodiesel.com/images/a6/engine/turbo-3.jpg. After you remove the bolt, the intake will rotate towards the back to disconnect it. Stuff a rag into the turbo side to prevent any dust or accidental part drops from entering the turbo.

    Remove the ventilator that you can see once you remove the turbo intake. It has a flex tube that comes out of the air filter box which connects to an aluminum part which is bolted on to the back of the engine. It is the aluminum piece in the foreground of this picture: http://www.myturbodiesel.com/images/a6/engine/turbo-3.jpg. It is connected on the right side of the engine with a snap connector as well, you can just pull it off that with a good tug.

    Now you have decent access to the actuator. (Note I said decent, it is still crappy access). Disconnect the 3 bolts which hold the actuator to the turbo. I then used a small screwdriver to hold the actuator with the shaft extended by sticking it through the bolt hole and resting the screwdriver on the top of the turbo.

    You can use some angled needle nose pliers or a screwdriver to remove the C-clip from the actuator rod.

    DO NOT MOVE THE TOP BOLT ON THE EXISTING ACTUATOR! THIS IS HOW YOU WILL ENSURE THAT YOU MAINTAIN THE SAME SETTING ON THE NEW ONE!

    Using a long 10mm socket and a small ratchet with fairly sensitive click points (something higher quality like Snap-On, etc so there is a small clearance between ratchet points), remove the lower bolt on the actuator rod. Once you break the lower bolt free from the glue, you should be able to lower the actuator off the turbo (remove the screwdriver) and remove that bolt by hand.

    Pull the actuator out of the car BEING CAREFUL NOT TO MOVE THE UPPER BOLT. Use a set of calipers to determine the distance between the bottom of the actuator where the rod extends and the top of the top bolt. Use this same distance on your new part. Use some of the included screw lock (it's the tube that had German all over it) to glue the top bolt into place. Give this time to dry.

    Once the glue has dried, run the actuator rod through the VNT lever on the turbo. You can apply a vacuum to the new actuator to extend the actuator rod to make connecting the bottom bolt easier. Make sure to use more of the glue on the bottom bolt. With both bolts on, clip on the new C-clip (this is also easier to do with the actuator rod extended).

    Reinstall the aluminum rear-engine ventilator, the turbo intake tubing (be sure to remove the rag you stuffed into the turbo intake itself) and the crank case ventilation shaft. Reconnect the MAF sensor, the vacuum to the actuator, the actuator sensor, the crank case ventilation sensor and the sensor at the end of the wire from the actuator sensor wire.

    MAKE SURE YOU DID NOT LEAVE ANY TOOLS, EXTRA BOLTS, ETC ON THE ENGINE!

    Double check that you do not have any disconnected wires, vacuum tubes, etc. Also ensure you have no spare parts. There should be none. Connect your VCDS to the car and start it up. Clear the CEL. Rev the engine a few times to ensure the CEL does not come back on. Run through the Auto-Scan to make sure VCDS does not report any additional faults related to the engine.

    Now take it for a test drive. Low power mode should no longer kick in, the glow plug light should no longer flash and the CEL should not turn on. Congratulations! You now have your fully functioning TDI back!


    Some additional notes:

    Apparently, in low-power mode, the car will not activate the DPF reburn. Ensure you only drive it where you must go while in low power mode while attempting to fix the issue. I believe I put ~100 miles on the car in low power mode before the DPF light came on. It took about 10-15 minutes of driving at constant speeds of 40+ for the DPF light to turn back off. Keep in mind the light will not turn off until you turn the car off and back on.

    Now that I know how to do this repair, it is not an overly terrible fix, however it is VERY tight space behind the engine to replace the actuator. Overall time to fix was one afternoon as much of it was spent figuring out how to get access. I would suspect using this walkthrough you could get the whole job done in a few hours.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2013
  7. smrtalec

    smrtalec New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2014
    Messages:
    1
    Car:
    03 VW Jetta GLS TDI
    Location:
    Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
    Mods:
    2" Nose Lift
    Hi guys
    i tend to a gree with dugaru...looks doable when the engine is out but practically impossible in the engine bay.
    ...and i think the above instructins will send you down a longer path.

    the job is easy if you simply remove the valve cover... as the picture indicates.
    IMG_20171222_160446.jpg
    no hidden b0lts no hard to get places no hussle. you simpy work frm the top.

    follow instructions on injector removal
    follow instructions on valve cover removal
    follow instructions on venting the air out of the fuel lines

    the rest is a walk in the park

    cheers
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 22, 2017
  8. Keithuk

    Keithuk Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
    Messages:
    7,235
    Car:
    2010 Golf GTD (170) CBBB
    Location:
    Stoke on Trent, England
    VAG Error Code: 000175/13011/9126/9127

    EOBD II Error Code: P00AF

    Fault Location:
    Actuator Module for Turbocharger 1 - Stuck

    Possible Cause:
    Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL)(K83) active.
    Glow Plug light flashing.
    Reduced engine performance.

    Defective Solenoid Valve for Boost Pressure Control (N75).
    Vacuum leak or low vacuum.
    Variable Nozzle Turbo (VNT) sticking or seized.
    Turbocharger Actuator Position Sensor (G581).

    Possible Solutions:
    Verify Solenoid Valve for Boost Pressure Control (N75) is working to design, use Output Testing.
    Verify vacuum lines are good, check engine vacuum at idle.
    Test Variable Nozzle Turbo (VNT) and Turbocharger Actuator Position Sensor (G581), apply vacuum to Variable Nozzle Turbo (VNT) and watch Measuring Value Blocks (MVB) 120.4.
    Engine off, no vacuum 120.4 should read about 3.5V.
    Engine Off, apply 17 Inches of mercury, 120.4 should drop to about 7V.
    Engine at idle, 120.4 should read about 7V.
    If 120.4 voltage doesn't alter, Variable Nozzle Turbo (VNT) may be seized or Turbocharger Actuator Position Sensor (G581) failed.

    Special Notes:
    On some TDI engines, the Vacuum Diaphragm/Charge Pressure Actuator Position Sensor (G581) unit can be purchased as a separate part from dealer.
    2.0L CR TDI owners may find this thread helpful.
    009571 - Turbocharger Boost Control Position Sensor Circuit P2563

    As taken from my new Free EOBD II Error Codes software
     

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